Impact of texting

Impact of texting

The rise of modern telecommunications has transformed the way people communicate, especially young people. According to a survey, 96 percent of college undergraduates own smartphones (vs 82 percent of adults overall). For college undergraduates, text messaging remains the single most popular way of communicating and many students view it as a key part of social life. This dependence on cell phones and other methods of communicating often leads to a “double-bind” with users feeling stressed over needing to be available at all times as well as feeling disoriented when that contact is no longer available.

Text messaging is linked to interpersonal stress in college students with poor health and well-being. Because of the demand of non-stop social interaction, texting magnifies the effects of interpersonal stress because of the time and energy involved. This leads to a greater cognitive and attentional load. While text messaging by itself does not automatically lead to problems, students already dealing with high levels of interpersonal stress are already more vulnerable to the problems linked to greater text messaging. This can also affect the sleep patterns of a student because the amount of texting is directly linked to students getting less sleep. With more students preferring text to talk, they do not get emotional exposure that hinders their emotional growth. A lack of face-to-face conversations keep students away from learning how to read facial expressions, body language and develop empathy — a skill learned from observing behavior in other people.