Management Development Insights

Actionable articles and insights for busy executives

Category: Management and Leadership (page 1 of 10)

The ART of Confrontation

art of confrontationOne of the facts about management that seems contrary to conventional wisdom is that most managers are really “nice” guys who do not like confronting their subordinates and holding them accountable. These managers consider this part of management to be a real hassle, something they would rather avoid. They believe this is an unnecessary evil and something they have to put up with as part of the heavy burden of management. Managers who think like this of course are never really going to be able to hold any one accountable. Then there is the mean-spirited manager who is completely task oriented, and who does not give a damn about people. Managers with some degree of balance between their concern for people and concern for holding the same people accountable for their performance are unfortunately a bit of a rarity.

So how does a manager strike a balance and make the process of confronting subordinates about their behavior or performance a bit easier and less stressful for both parties?..

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Emotional Intelligence – The 2 Main Parts

Based on an article by Daniel Goleman

emotional intelligenceDaniel Goleman, the “inventor” of the concept of Emotional Intelligence, says he once met a  CEO who complained that despite having MBAs from great universities, many of his managers were unable to perform and deliver. The explanation for this according to Daniel Goleman lies in the interplay between IQ and emotional intelligence. For high performance and leadership, you need both…

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Management Mistakes – The Top 5

management mistakesMaking mistakes is everyone’s right. However, learning from one’s own mistakes and learning from others’ mistakes is essential. Like everyone else, managers also make a lot of mistakes so here is a list of the top 5 management mistakes that managers need to avoid…

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The Brain at Work

This is an extract from an article with the same title in the Harvard Business Review authored by Adam Waytz and Malia Mason.

brain at workNeuroscience which is the science of how the brain works has been around for a long time but it has taught us surprisingly little about how the mind works. The few things it has taught though have been articulated very well.  This article is about those few things. These are the default, reward, affect, and control core neural networks.  The role of these networks  and their implications for people managers are now starting to be understood.

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Lean Management

Lean ManagementLean management began as an effort at Toyota to reduce time for a manufacturing process and thus reduce in-process inventory. This became known as just-in-time inventory management. The result was less warehouse space, fewer forklifts, less workshop space, etc. Once the flow of work can be free of  interruption and unnecessary repeat work, waste is eliminated. Lean is therefore the elimination of waste. But, more importantly, lean is continuous improvement in all work processes…

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Staff Hiring – Making This (Almost) Foolproof

staff hiringFrom behavioral interviewing techniques to psychometric testing, managers have access to a range of tools to make the staff hiring process foolproof and reduce the possibility of the wrong hire. The reality is that no process can make the hiring completely foolproof. But it is possible to make the process almost foolproof by using a tried and tested approach to effective hiring…

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How Leadership Has Changed

The information in this article is based on published research carried out by Center for Creative Leadership (CCL)…

How Leadership Has ChangedThe way the priority and the focus on leadership has changed is a function of how organizational and leadership thinking has evolved over the last 30 years or so. To illustrate the difference, we contrast across various situations what leadership used to be and what it means now:

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